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09/09/19What to do if you think you’ll never retire

More people are paying into a pension than ever before. Yet, millions are still worried they’ll never be able to retire. If you have concerns about the retirement lifestyle you will be able to afford, there are often steps you can take to improve this.

First, the good news: the number of people saving enough for retirement has hit its highest ever level, according to Scottish Widows. Almost three in five Brits are deemed to be putting enough aside for retirement, calculated at 12% of an individual’s income. However, a worrying number expect they’ll never be able to afford to give up work. Around a fifth of people believe they won’t be financially secure enough to retire, equating to eight million individuals.

With fewer Defined Benefit (DB) schemes available, which offer a guaranteed income for life, individuals need to take more responsibility for their retirement finances. But the research indicates a large portion of the population don’t have confidence in the steps they’re taking.

Peter Glancy, Head of Policy at Scottish Widows, said: “While the past 15 years alone have proved that things have been changed for the better, auto-enrolment alone won’t avert a pension crisis in the UK. Government and industry need to take the next step together and also stop pretending the long-term savings challenge can be solved in isolation.”

6 things to do if you’re worried about pension savings

In recent years, the responsibility for creating a retirement income has shifted to individuals. The number of Defined Benefit (DB) pensions schemes has been falling. Also, Pension Freedoms mean retirees are now often responsible for how and when they access pension savings. As a result, it’s natural to have some concerns about how your retirement provisions will provide for you.

If you’re worried you won’t be able to afford retirement or are unsure of the lifestyle you’ll be able to enjoy, these six steps may help.

1. Assess your current savings

Whilst the Sottish Widows research highlights millions are worried about retirement, it doesn’t state how much these people have put away. It may be that some are in a better position than they believe, particularly when looking at the long term.

The first thing to do is look at the amount you have already saved. The majority of workers will have several pensions due to switching jobs; getting a current value for them all is important. This will give you a figure to assess whether or not you’re on track. Remember, most pensions are invested, and the value will hopefully grow between now and when you hope to retire. Providers will give you a projected value at traditional retirement age, however, this cannot be guaranteed.

2. Check contributions

Next, how much are you contributing to your pension? If you’ve been auto-enrolled into a pension by your employer, the minimum you contribute is currently 5% of qualifying earnings. However, you can choose to increase this. The end goal for pension savings can seem daunting, but it’s worth remembering your employer will also be contributing at least 3% and you’ll benefit from tax relief. These two incentives can significantly boost the amount you’re putting away.

With a baseline for how much you’re already putting away, you may want to consider increasing contributions. Even a small rise in how much you put away each month can have a big impact. When saving for life after work, a pension is often the most efficient way to save. Some employers will also increase their contributions in line with yours.

3. Don’t forget the State Pension

It’s not just your Personal and Workplace Pensions that will provide an income in retirement. For many, the State Pension will be the foundation. Once you’ve factored in how much you can expect to receive from the State Pension, the amount you need to take responsibility for can seem far less challenging.

The State Pension alone won’t usually provide you with enough to secure the retirement lifestyle you want. But it does provide a level of security and maybe enough to cover essential outgoings. How much you’ll receive will depend on your National Insurance record. To qualify for the full amount, paying out £8,767.20 annually in 2019/20, you’d need to have 35 qualifying years on your National Insurance record. You can check how much your State Pension is likely to be here.

4. Calculate other sources of income

Whilst pensions are the most common way to create an income in retirement, they’re not the only option. Other assets you’ve built up throughout your working life can also be used and may be important to your personal financial plan. Yet, when initially looking at how affordable retirement is, you may have missed these out.

Among the assets to consider are savings, investments and property. How these assets can be used in retirement will depend on your situation and goals, but it’s important they’re not overlooked. Even if you don’t intend to use them in retirement, knowing you have assets to fall back on if necessary, can give you the confidence needed to approach this important milestone.

5. Consider the costs of retirement

If you think you can’t afford to retire, what are you basing this on? If you’re looking at your current expenditure, you may be overestimating how much you need. Most people find their necessary income falls in retirement as some significant costs decrease. You may, for instance, no longer have a mortgage to pay or save each month on travel costs once you’re not commuting.

The cost of retirement is individual and is linked to your plans. Taking some time to figure out how much you need can help you identify if there is a shortfall or where adjustments can be made if needed. According to Which? research, the average retired household spends around £27,000 a year. This is made up of basic areas of expenditure (£17,800 annually) and some luxuries.

6. Speak to a financial adviser

We often find that people are in a better position than they think when they consider the above five factors. We’re here to help you pull together the different sources of income that can be used in retirement and understand how they’ll provide for you. Using cashflow modelling, we’ll be able to demonstrate how your current provisions will last throughout retirement and how changes to your saving habits will have an effect in the short, medium and long term. If you’re worried about financial security in retirement, please get in touch.

Please note: A pension is a long-term investment. The fund value may fluctuate and can go down, which would have an impact on the level of pension benefits available. Your pension income could also be affected by the interest rates at the time you take your benefits. The tax implications of pension withdrawals will be based on your individual circumstances, tax legislation and regulations which are subject to change in the future.

Equity Release will reduce the value of your estate and can affect your eligibility for means-tested benefits.

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Robert Terry t/a High Edge Financial Planning is an appointed representative of Sanlam Partnerships Limited which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. FCA No: 563682.

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